Great Lakes Region

Properties under management in the Great Lakes Region total 402,772 acres, located in Michigan’s Upper Peninsula, Northern Wisconsin and Central Ontario, Canada.  Timber types range from natural stands of northern hardwoods, aspen, spruce, fir and pine in the uplands to spruce, cedar, tamarack, ash and lowland complexes on the wetter soils.  Some of the properties also have plantations of red and jack pine, tamarack and white spruce established on them.  The general management focus is toward natural regeneration systems for both hardwood and softwood timber types.  A variety of intermediate treatments are utilized to encourage regeneration, diversify species mix, and improve the growth and vigor of residual stems.  Harvesting activities can occur throughout the year.  However activities often slow in the spring during a period known as “Break-Up”.

Of note within the region, over 30,000 acres are encumbered by two working forest conservation easements. In Wisconsin, The Chippewa Flowage Forest protects over 18,000 acres of forestland in Sawyer County on the WNH_NMTC property, and the Wabikon Waters and Woodlands conservation easement protects over 12,000 acres on the Wabikon-Iron River property.  The primary goals of these easements are to maintain biodiversity and biological flow across the landscape, restrict subdivision and development, provide public access for hunting and fishing, keep the property on the local tax rolls and continue timber management to support the forest products industries for generations to come.

.In Michigan, most of the properties are enrolled in the Commercial Forest program.  As such, they are open to the public for Hunting, Fishing and Trapping.  Legal access by the public to these lands is at minimum by foot.  Many road systems remain open for vehicular access, but some have been blocked with rock or earth berms or are gated to protect the resource.  Motorized vehicles (including ORV’s) are not permitted beyond closed gates and berms.  Hunting blinds on Michigan properties are to be portable in nature and removed daily.  Tree stands and steps must be strap on, and may not penetrate the trees bark.  No cutting of trees, limbs or brush is permitted for creation of shooting lanes or blinds.  Camping, camp fires, firewood collection, dragging of roads, and dumping are not permitted on the property.  Additional restrictions may apply to certain tracts and will be posted as such

In Wisconsin, most of the properties are enrolled in the Managed Forest Law program.  As such, they are open to the public for hunting, fishing, cross-country skiing, hiking and sight-seeing.  Motorized vehicles licensed for highway use are not permitted beyond closed gates, berms and road posted closed.  ORV’s (unless on designated trails under permit) are prohibited.  Hunting blinds on Wisconsin properties are to be portable in nature and removed daily.  Tree stands and steps must be strap on, and may not penetrate the trees bark.  No cutting of trees, limbs or brush is permitted for creation of shooting lanes or blinds.  Camping, camp fires, firewood collection, dragging of roads, and dumping are not permitted on the property.  Additional restrictions may apply to certain tracts and will be posted as such.

In Ontario, properties are generally considered closed to the public, except as provided by Federal and Provincial statute, and with the following exceptions:

  • One snowmobile trail through the Garden River Forestlands property is licensed to the Sault Trailblazers Association, and is open for public use with an appropriate license.
  • The Voyageur Trail Association maintains a hiking/snowshoe trail across the Garden River Forestlands property as part of their northern Ontario wilderness trail system from Sudbury to Thunder Bay.
  • Paddling on the Batchawana River is also permitted through the Algoma property, provided use of the river banks is limited to portages and short breaks, and is done in an environmentally responsible manner.

Use of the property in association with these activities is limited strictly to transit across the property.  Camping, fires, or off-trail activity is not permitted.

The former Algoma Central Railroad, now operated by Canadian National Railroad, is known for its Snow Train and Agawa Canyon fall color tours originating in Sault Ste. Marie. Riders will pass through the center of the Algoma property on their tour, and can enjoy wonderful views of forests, rock bluffs, lakes and rivers along the way.

For more detail on a specific property, click the property name on the map.

Great Lakes Region Properties

Great Lakes Region Documents